Primary Children's Hospital – Utah http://www.primarychildrenshospitalblog.org Mon, 17 Jul 2017 19:47:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.5 87830652 Kids and Family Travel — How to Make it Safe and Fun http://www.primarychildrenshospitalblog.org/kids-family-travel-make-safe-fun/ http://www.primarychildrenshospitalblog.org/kids-family-travel-make-safe-fun/#respond Mon, 17 Jul 2017 19:47:22 +0000 http://www.primarychildrenshospitalblog.org/?p=5143 Warm weather and no school often means family travel time. By road or air, here are 12 tips to help you and your kids have fun and travel safe this summer. On the Road Buckle up! Using seatbelts is the single most important thing a family can do to stay safe in the car. Check […]

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Warm weather and no school often means family travel time. By road or air, here are 12 tips to help you and your kids have fun and travel safe this summer.

On the Road

  • Buckle up! Using seatbelts is the single most important thing a family can do to stay safe in the car.
  • Check your car seat. 73 percent of car seats are not used or installed correctly, so before you leave, do a quick inventory to make sure your children are riding in the right seat and that they are installed and used correctly. Go to our website for additional tips and videos or visit one of our trained Car Seat Technicians for a free car seat inspection. Call us at (801) 662-CARS to make an appointment.
  • Make sure all children ride in the back seat. The back seat is the safest for children until at least age 13.
  • Don’t drive distracted. Teach kids the importance of staying quiet and calm in the car so the driver can focus. If your kids need help with something, pull over rather than try to help them while driving. Limit phone conversations and don’t text and drive!
  • Never leave your child alone in the car, not even for a minute. Heatstroke is the leading cause of non-crash, vehicle-related deaths for children.

On a Plane

  • Remember your car seat. Check to make sure the car seat is labeled “certified for use in motor vehicles and aircraft.” For babies and toddlers, this is the safest way to travel. If you are traveling with a child with special healthcare needs call TSA Cares at 1-855-787-2227.
  • Prepare for possible emergencies. Make sure you are aware of emergency equipment or procedures that would apply to your child. If your child has a medical condition that may become an issue during the flight, make the flight attendant aware of the possibility before takeoff.
  • Bring all essentials for your child in carry-on luggage. Bring enough food, diapers, medicine and other items to last through possible flight delays. This can be especially important if your child is on a special diet or medication.
  • Seat your child away from the aisle. Small children enjoy exploring, but if they are on the aisle they could get hurt if their arm gets bumped by a person or serving cart going down the aisle. Some airlines require a car seat to be placed in a window seat, so be sure to call ahead when booking your flight to find out the specific requirements of each airline.

Away from Home

  • When staying with family who don’t have young children, be aware that their home may not be fully safe for small kids. Be aware of dangers such as button batteries, magnets and small toys.
  • Make sure family members keep any medication up and out of reach of children.
  • Always supervise your children around water. If you are around open bodies of water, make sure kids are wearing Coast Guard Approved life jackets. If there are multiple adults watching kids near water, take turns being the designated “water watcher” so someone is always actively supervising.

Summer is the perfect time to get out and enjoy traveling to new places. By following these tips you can make sure the memories you make will include nothing but fun.

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The Buzz About Caffeine: How Much are Your Kids Consuming? http://www.primarychildrenshospitalblog.org/buzz-caffeine-much-kids-consuming/ http://www.primarychildrenshospitalblog.org/buzz-caffeine-much-kids-consuming/#respond Wed, 12 Jul 2017 18:04:04 +0000 http://www.primarychildrenshospitalblog.org/?p=5139 A hit of caffeine from morning coffee or an afternoon energy shot may be OK for adults, but can prove problematic for children. What is Caffeine? You can find caffeine in coffee, soda, ice cream, chocolate, energy drinks, medication and more, but contrary to popular belief, it’s not a nutrient. Instead, it’s a naturally-occurring stimulant […]

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A hit of caffeine from morning coffee or an afternoon energy shot may be OK for adults, but can prove problematic for children.

What is Caffeine?

You can find caffeine in coffee, soda, ice cream, chocolate, energy drinks, medication and more, but contrary to popular belief, it’s not a nutrient. Instead, it’s a naturally-occurring stimulant that effects our central nervous system — brain, spinal cord and nerves.

In can help us feel more alert, awake and energetic, but too much can cause depressions, restlessness, nausea nutrient absorption deficiency, increased anxiety and sleep problems. Kids have an especially low tolerance for caffeine, which means even small doses can be unhealthy.

In a recent study, kids who consumed the most caffeine also slept the fewest hours. And in a tragic and rare occurrence, a teen died from caffeine overdose earlier this year.

Guidelines

The FDA recommends that adults limit caffeine intake to 400 mg per day, which is roughly four to five cups of coffee. There aren’t any FDA recommendations for kids, but there are a couple other sources that provide good directions. Health Canada recommends that children 12 years old and younger limit caffeine intake to 45-85 mg per day, depending on a variety of other factors. The American Academy of Pediatrics discourages any caffeine consumption.

How Much Caffeine?

  • Starbucks Coffee (tall, 12 oz.) = 260 mg
  • Starbucks Espresso (solo) = 75 mg
  • 5-hour energy shot (2 oz.) = 200 mg, extra strength = 230 mg
  • Rock Star (24 oz.) = 240 mg
  • Red Bull (8.46 oz.) = 80 mg
  • Coca Cola (12oz.) = 34 mg
  • Tea (8 oz.) = 48 mg
  • Hot chocolate (12 oz.) = 20 mg
  • Ben and Jerry’s Ice Cream “Coffee Coffee Buzz Buzz Buzz” (1 cup) = 100 mg
  • OTC Tablets (per tablet) = 200 mg

The Bottom Line

If you’re kids aren’t consuming caffeine, then help them keep it that way. If they are, look at ways to cut back and make lifestyle changes to minimize or eliminate caffeine. Recognize that there may be withdrawal symptoms like headaches, drowsiness and irritability, but these will go away as caffeine intake decreases. Less is more when it comes to caffeine.

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“We Were Blessed Daily by the Amazing Staff at Primary Children’s” http://www.primarychildrenshospitalblog.org/blessed-daily-amazing-staff-primary-childrens/ http://www.primarychildrenshospitalblog.org/blessed-daily-amazing-staff-primary-childrens/#respond Mon, 03 Jul 2017 22:00:34 +0000 http://www.primarychildrenshospitalblog.org/?p=5131 My daughter, Heather, was born with Down syndrome. This brought us to Primary Children’s Hospital many times. We saw many therapists and she had multiple minor surgeries. At age 10, she was diagnosed with ALL (Acute Lymphatic Leukemia). At this point our casual relation with the hospital became a constant reality. She had a very difficult strain of ALL […]

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My daughter, Heather, was born with Down syndrome. This brought us to Primary Children’s Hospital many times. We saw many therapists and she had multiple minor surgeries.

At age 10, she was diagnosed with ALL (Acute Lymphatic Leukemia). At this point our casual relation with the hospital became a constant reality. She had a very difficult strain of ALL and was very slow to respond to the chemotherapy, which required her to receive extra treatments and cranial radiation. Her treatment included 9 months of chemo, with another year and a half of maintenance chemo.

She was cancer free for 15 months, but then relapsed. She had to undergo a bone marrow transplant, which was a very difficult procedure. Amazingly, she had three sibling matches! Her sweet brother was her donor. She spent 108 days in the hospital and had many difficult problems, but she engrafted beautifully and was then event free going into her two-year checkup.

As we met this milestone, we were told we could breathe as there was only a very slight chance her cancer would return. We didn’t get to breathe very long. Within six weeks, her cancer returned. It was so hard to go back to the hospital. In less than two weeks, she had two septic infections (bacterial and yeast) with zero white blood cells to fight it. This was too much for her, and she passed away four days later. We were heartbroken, but also grateful for the six years of great care, concern, and love we received by countless specialists at Primary Children’s.

Primary Children’s Hospital created a caring, safe atmosphere where Heather was comfortable even through very difficult times. After many years of treatment and spending many days in PCH, she was still happy to come back. She would point to the fourth floor and say “I want a room, there.”

We were blessed daily if not hourly by the amazing staff at PCH. Just a few of the things I am grateful for:

  • Doctors and specialists who took great care in finding the best treatments for Heather’s special needs.
  • Doctors who took time to kneel at her bedside and talk to Heather face-to-face.
  • Residents who took time to consult and talk to Heather and me in the middle of bad nights, and invited a princess to visit her.
  • Nurses who did so many things to let her know she was important to them. (Having her favorite meal in the fridge after a late surgery, being her advocate with the doctors, letting her choose the spot for her insulin shots, showing interest in her life, treating her like a princess, and even dressing up like a princess, just for her.)
  • Volunteers who went the extra mile to find the right video game, or just be her friend.
  • Child life specialists helping her think that having a Broviac line is cool.
  • Music therapists who learned her favorite songs.
  • Extraordinary care from social workers, respiratory therapists, chaplains, and specialists.
  • Cute little smiley people on her breakfast tray.
  • Environmental workers who brightened her days with smiles and kindness.

I could write a book.

I’ve served on the Family Advisory Council for six years because it’s a way to give back for the great treatment and care Heather received here. I am grateful to share many wonderful stories of extraordinary care with medical interns, new nurses and other panels. Hopefully, they will inspire continued great care at PCH. We had many experiences here, over 17 years, we hope our perspective as a patient’s family may be beneficial.


This article was written by Roxanne Probst. Roxanne is a member of the Primary Children’s Hospital Family Advisory Council.

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Heatstroke and Kids: Even 10 Minutes Alone Could be Deadly http://www.primarychildrenshospitalblog.org/heatstroke-kids-even-10-minutes-alone-deadly/ http://www.primarychildrenshospitalblog.org/heatstroke-kids-even-10-minutes-alone-deadly/#respond Sat, 17 Jun 2017 13:45:21 +0000 http://www.primarychildrenshospitalblog.org/?p=5121 Never Leave A Child Alone in a Car Babies and young kids can sometimes sleep so peacefully that we forget they’re even there. It can also be tempting to leave a baby alone in a car while we quickly run into the store. Leaving a child alone in a car, however, can lead to serious […]

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Never Leave A Child Alone in a Car

Babies and young kids can sometimes sleep so peacefully that we forget they’re even there. It can also be tempting to leave a baby alone in a car while we quickly run into the store. Leaving a child alone in a car, however, can lead to serious injury or death from heatstroke. Young children are particularly at risk, as their bodies heat up three to five times faster than an adult’s. These tragedies are completely preventable. In the United States this year, there have been 12 deaths related to heatstroke and we haven’t even reached the hottest days of summer yet.

Here are some tips from Safe Kids Worldwide on how we can work together to keep kids safe from heatstroke.

Remember to ACT:

  • A: Avoid heatstroke related injury and death by never leaving your child alone in a car, not even for a minute. And make sure to keep your car locked when you’re not in it so kids don’t get in on their own.
  • C: Create reminders by putting something in the back of your car next to your child such as a briefcase, a purse or a cell phone that is needed at your final destination. This is especially important if you’re not following your normal routine.
  • T: Take action. If you see a child alone in a car, call 911. Emergency personnel want you to call. They are trained to respond to these situations. One call could save a life.

Go a Step Further: 

  • Create extra reminders and communicate with daycare. Create a calendar reminder for your electronic devices to make sure you dropped your child off at daycare.
  • Develop a plan with your daycare so that if your child is late, you’ll be called within a few minutes. Be especially careful if you change your routine for dropping off children at daycare.

Teach Kids Not to Play in Cars

  • Make sure to lock your vehicle, including doors and trunk, when you’re not using it. Keep keys and remote entry fobs out of children’s sight and reach.
  • Teach kids that trunks are for transporting cargo and are not safe places to play.
  • If your child is missing, get help and check swimming pools, vehicles and trunks. If your children are locked in a car, get them out as quickly as possible and call 911 immediately. Emergency personnel are trained to evaluate and check for signs of heatstroke.

If you want a copy of these tips, click here. You can also call 801.662.6580 for free Kids In Cars safety information or download a pdf at primarychildrens.org/safety.

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Food Pouches = Picky Eaters? A Dietitian’s Word of Caution http://www.primarychildrenshospitalblog.org/food-pouches-cause-picky-eaters/ http://www.primarychildrenshospitalblog.org/food-pouches-cause-picky-eaters/#respond Fri, 16 Jun 2017 21:08:43 +0000 http://www.primarychildrenshospitalblog.org/?p=5118 In the hands of toddlers and diaper bags, food pouches are becoming an increasingly popular option for hungry children. Those convenient foil packets filled with a variety of fruits and vegetables, and sometimes whole grains, offer an easy way to sneak in valuable nutrients that children often refuse otherwise. Still, they’re far from perfect, and […]

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In the hands of toddlers and diaper bags, food pouches are becoming an increasingly popular option for hungry children. Those convenient foil packets filled with a variety of fruits and vegetables, and sometimes whole grains, offer an easy way to sneak in valuable nutrients that children often refuse otherwise.

Still, they’re far from perfect, and could make feeding more difficult for children in the long run (think “picky eaters”). Here are some concerns from a pediatric dietitian that parents should be aware of before reaching for the next food pouch.

Infants have transitions or “windows” of time when they move from one type of food to another. There are several of these windows during the first few years of life. If a child misses a window of opportunity, the chance of having feeding difficulties increases.

Food selectivity or “pickiness” is the most common feeding problem in young children and this can be influenced by how solid foods are introduced. Overuse of food pouches during the window when children should be experiencing textures and individual flavors may contribute to feeding difficulties and “pickiness” later on.

Reasons to Use Food Pouches with Caution

Below are some of the nutrition concerns regarding the overuse of food pouches:

  • Can interfere with the senses: Children should explore food. Using all five senses to explore foods individually offers many benefits and can help kids develop healthy eating habits. A few examples:
    • Taste: creamy avocado
    • Smells: fresh citrus orange
    • Sounds: crisp apple
    • Touch: the bumpy texture of broccoli
    • Sight: bold red tomatoes
  • Disrupts appetite:  Calories in a pureed or blended form are easy and quick to consume, but this may interfere with appetite and result in excessive calorie intake and over-consumption of sugar.
  • Takes away from family meal times: Food pouches are a “fast food” approach to eating. If a pouch is necessary at a meal time, continue to offer it at the table and consider emptying the pouch first into a bowl and use a spoon to serve.
  • May cause pickiness: Pouches are often given for convenience so mom and dad can get errands done. This leads to grazing, which is a leading cause of picky behaviors.

Food pouches can offer convenience and sometimes are appropriate for children with feeding difficulties, but should be limited. Exposing children to individual foods through all their senses is a healthier approach to encourage good nutrition.


This article was written by Tara Finnerty, RDN, CSP, CD. Tara is a pediatric dietitian at Primary Children’s Hospital.

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Sometimes the Best Medicine for Cancer is a Rod and a Reel http://www.primarychildrenshospitalblog.org/cancer-patients-get-break-fly-fish/ http://www.primarychildrenshospitalblog.org/cancer-patients-get-break-fly-fish/#respond Tue, 13 Jun 2017 23:01:48 +0000 http://www.primarychildrenshospitalblog.org/?p=5112 Two University of Utah School of Medicine professors, a handful of fly rods and a host of fishing flies came together for a wonderful weekend escape for a group of Primary Children’s Hospital cancer patients and their families. Tim Jenkins and Ki Aston were the brains behind the event. They’ve loved fishing since they were […]

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Two University of Utah School of Medicine professors, a handful of fly rods and a host of fishing flies came together for a wonderful weekend escape for a group of Primary Children’s Hospital cancer patients and their families.

Tim Jenkins and Ki Aston were the brains behind the event. They’ve loved fishing since they were kids and have turned that love into a successful business. They wanted to give back to the community and felt like this would be the perfect opportunity.

“For me, fly fishing is relaxing and a great escape from everything,” said Jenkins, a researcher and assistant professor at the University of Utah School of Medicine, Division of Urology. “We wanted to help some patients at Primary Children’s enjoy fun with their families and thought this would be a great fit.”

Jenkins and Aston put out a call on social media to get assistance for the trip and received an overwhelming response. Individuals and companies from around the world responded by donating thousands of fishing flies and a couple fly rods for each of the families. Jenkins and Aston’s families joined in the fun by assembling the fly boxes.

The fishing and fun took place at Falcon’s Ledge in Eastern Utah, a great set-up for the kids and families.

“The area was perfect,” Jenkins said. “We had areas that were easy to access for the kids who couldn’t go as far and we set up a craft area in the lodge for the younger kids.”

It was the first time fly fishing for most of the families, but you wouldn’t know that based on their success.

“The kids caught on quickly and each family caught around a dozen trout,” said Ki Aston, also a researcher and associate professor at the University of Utah School of Medicine, Division of Urology. “This was a great opportunity for the families to spend a relaxing day together away from the hospitals, treatments and testing. Everyone said they had a great time.”

The kids and families had a great time, but so did Jenkins and Aston.

“We’ve had some pretty cool days after forming our company, but we genuinely feel this was the coolest day we’ve had so far,” Jenkins said.

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7 Tips To Keep Your Kids Safe Around Water http://www.primarychildrenshospitalblog.org/water-safety-tips/ http://www.primarychildrenshospitalblog.org/water-safety-tips/#respond Sat, 10 Jun 2017 03:26:49 +0000 http://www.primarychildrenshospitalblog.org/?p=5110 It’s summer – and a great time to take little ones swimming, play outside, and enjoy family time. Just remember to use extra caution with kids around water. In Utah, drowning is the second leading cause of death for children under age 14. Primary Children’s Hospital provides information and community education about water safety to […]

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kids playing in water safetyIt’s summer – and a great time to take little ones swimming, play outside, and enjoy family time. Just remember to use extra caution with kids around water. In Utah, drowning is the second leading cause of death for children under age 14.

Primary Children’s Hospital provides information and community education about water safety to prevent injury and death. Consider these 7 tips next time you take your family outside and are recreating in or near water.

7 Tips For Water Safety

  1. Teach your children to swim and always supervise them around water
    – Be sure adults are present and actively watching children when they swim.
    – Take turns with other adults so there is always a dedicated water-watcher.
    – Water wings are not sufficient floatation devices, as they can deflate or fall off. We recommend life jackets. Supervision is always recommended.
  2. Water at any depth can be hazardous.
    – Young children are top-heavy. Swimming pools, bathtubs, and containers with even a little water can result in a toddler falling in head first and possibly, unable to get out of the water by themselves.
    – When not in use, kiddie pools and other containers should be drained and turned upside-down to prevent injury.
  3.  If you have a pool, keep a closed gate around it at all times.
  4. Use extra caution and care to supervise children near lakes, rivers and streams.
  5. Teach children to stay away from water while hiking or camping. With lots of precipitation and snow runoff, rivers are fast, full, and cold, making them deadly.
  6. If a child is missing, always check nearby water first.
  7. Learn CPR

Additional Water Safety Information:

 

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Don’t Fry Today — Sun Safety Tips for Parents and Kids http://www.primarychildrenshospitalblog.org/dont-fry-today-sun-safety-tips-parents-kids/ http://www.primarychildrenshospitalblog.org/dont-fry-today-sun-safety-tips-parents-kids/#respond Fri, 26 May 2017 15:20:54 +0000 http://www.primarychildrenshospitalblog.org/?p=5102 Did you know that more people will be diagnosed with skin cancer this year than breast, prostate, lung and colon cancer combined? Most kids get much of their lifetime sun exposure before age 18, so it’s important for parents to teach and model for their kids how to safely enjoy the sun. We all need […]

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Did you know that more people will be diagnosed with skin cancer this year than breast, prostate, lung and colon cancer combined? Most kids get much of their lifetime sun exposure before age 18, so it’s important for parents to teach and model for their kids how to safely enjoy the sun.

We all need some sun exposure in order to maintain a good level of vitamin D, but it doesn’t take as much time as you might think. Most people only need to be in the sun for as few as ten minutes, but when the weather is good, most of us want to be out much longer than that! So creating a few sun safety habits it key to protecting yourself.

Simple Rules for Sun Safety

  • Keep babies younger than 6 months out of direct sunlight. Find shade under a tree, an umbrella or the stroller canopy.
  • When possible, dress yourself and your children in cool, comfortable clothing that covers the body, such as lightweight cotton pants, long-sleeved shirts and hats.
  • Select clothes made with a tight weave — they protect better than clothes with a looser weave. If you’re not sure how tight a fabrics weave is, hold it up to see how much light shines through, the less light, the better. You can also look for protective clothing labeled with an Ultraviolet Protection Factor (UPF).
  • Wear a hat with an all-around 3-inch brim to shield the face, ears and back of the neck.
  • Limit your sun exposure between 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. when UV rays are strongest.
  • Wear sunglasses with at least 99% UV protection. Look for child-sized sunglasses with UV protection for your kids.
  • Use sunscreen.

About Sunscreen

Sunscreen can help protect the skin from sunburn and some skin cancers, but only if used correctly. Keep in mind that sunscreen should be used for sun protection, not as a reason to stay in the sun longer.

How to Pick Sunscreen:

  • Use a sunscreen that says “broad-spectrum” on the label; that means it will screen out both UVB and UVA rays.
  • Use a broad-spectrum sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 15 and up to SPF 50. An SPF of 15 to 30 is generally fine for most people.
  • If swimming or sweating use a water-resistant sunscreen.
  • Check the expiration date before use to make sure it’s still effective. Most sunscreens are good for 2-3 years unless they’ve been exposed to long periods of heat.

Apply your sunscreen properly. Ideally about a palm full of sunscreen should be used to cover the arms, legs, neck and faces of the average adult. Sunscreen needs to be re-applied at least every two hours, and more frequently if you are swimming or sweating.

Being smart in the sun doesn’t mean that you can’t have fun. Taking precautions in the sun can actually help you enjoy yourself even more since you won’t have to worry about getting a painful sunburn or suffering the long-term effects of skin damage. The sun doesn’t have to be your enemy, just practice good sun sense!

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Allergies — identify and treat the sneezing, wheezing and coughing http://www.primarychildrenshospitalblog.org/seasonal-allergies-identify-treat/ http://www.primarychildrenshospitalblog.org/seasonal-allergies-identify-treat/#respond Thu, 25 May 2017 21:38:10 +0000 http://www.primarychildrenshospitalblog.org/?p=5099 “Achoo!” It’s your child’s third sneezing fit of the morning, and as you hand him another tissue you wonder if these cold-like symptoms — the sneezing, congestion, and runny nose — have something to do with the recent weather change. If he gets similar symptoms at the same time every year, you’re likely right — […]

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“Achoo!” It’s your child’s third sneezing fit of the morning, and as you hand him another tissue you wonder if these cold-like symptoms — the sneezing, congestion, and runny nose — have something to do with the recent weather change. If he gets similar symptoms at the same time every year, you’re likely right — seasonal allergies are at work.

Why Do I Get Allergies?

Seasonal allergies, sometimes called “hay fever” or seasonal allergic rhinitis, are allergy symptoms that happen during certain times of the year, usually when outdoor molds release their spores, and trees, grasses and weeds release tiny pollen particles into the air to fertilize other plants.

The immune systems of people who are allergic to mold spores or pollen treat these particles (called allergens) as invaders and release chemicals, including histamine, into the bloodstream to defend against them. It’s the release of these chemicals that causes allergy symptoms.

People can be allergic to one or more types of pollen or mold. The type someone is allergic to determines when symptoms happen. Mold spores tend to peak midsummer through the fall, depending on location.

Even kids who have never had seasonal allergies in years past can develop them. Seasonal allergies can start at almost any age, though they usually develop by the time someone is 10 years old and reach their peak in the early twenties, with symptoms often disappearing later in adulthood.

Signs and Symptoms

If your child develops a “cold” at the same time every year, seasonal allergies might be to blame. Allergy symptoms, which usually come on suddenly and last as long as a person is exposed to the allergen, can include:

  • sneezing
  • itchy nose and/or throat
  • nasal congestion
  • clear, runny nose
  • coughing

These symptoms often come with itchy, watery, and/or red eyes, which is called allergic conjunctivitis. Kids who have wheezing and shortness of breath in addition to these symptoms might have allergies that trigger asthma.

Treatment

Talk with your doctor if you think your child might have allergies. There are many ways to treat seasonal allergies, depending on how severe the symptoms are. The most important part of treatment is knowing what allergens are at work. Some kids can get relief by reducing or eliminating exposure to allergens that bother them.

If certain seasons cause symptoms, keep the windows closed, use air conditioning if possible, and stay indoors when pollen/mold/weed counts are high. It’s also a good idea for kids with seasonal allergies to wash their hands or shower and change clothing after playing outside.

If reducing exposure isn’t possible or is ineffective, medicines can help ease allergy symptoms. These may include decongestants, antihistamines, and nasal spray steroids. If symptoms can’t be managed with medicines, the doctor may recommend taking your child to an allergist or immunologist for evaluation for allergy shots (immunotherapy), which can help desensitize kids to specific allergens.

 

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What Does Giving Back Look Like? Just Ask 7-year-old Nellie Mainor http://www.primarychildrenshospitalblog.org/giving-back-look-like-just-ask-7-year-old-nellie-mainor/ http://www.primarychildrenshospitalblog.org/giving-back-look-like-just-ask-7-year-old-nellie-mainor/#respond Tue, 23 May 2017 19:05:10 +0000 http://www.primarychildrenshospitalblog.org/?p=5092 “How many toys have you collected?” “A lot, like close to a 100,” says Nellie. “You’ve collected a lot more than that,” replies Nellie’s mom, Sarah. “So, like 105?” Nellie asks. In reality, Nellie Mainor, a 7-year-old, collected and donated 584 toys as a birthday present to give to Primary Children’s Hospital — a place […]

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“How many toys have you collected?”

“A lot, like close to a 100,” says Nellie.

“You’ve collected a lot more than that,” replies Nellie’s mom, Sarah.

“So, like 105?” Nellie asks.

In reality, Nellie Mainor, a 7-year-old, collected and donated 584 toys as a birthday present to give to Primary Children’s Hospital — a place where she spends a lot of time these days. Every Monday, Wednesday and Friday, Nellie is in the Dialysis Clinic receiving a four-hour treatment, followed by a 30-minute infusion at the hospital. This has been her routine since February, when she was diagnosed with a rare kidney disease called Dense Deposit Disease.

“I love all the nurses and caregivers here,” Nellie says. “I wanted to give back to the hospital, because they have taken care of me and they’ve given me a lot of cool toys.”

The idea is centered around Nellie’s birthday, which her family celebrates the entire month of April. Nellie decided she wanted to give the hospital a birthday present and began collecting toys from the Primary Children’s wish list. She reached out to family, friends and even local businesses who helped her collect hundreds of toys, electronics and craft supplies.

“The toys and different craft projects have made difficult times a little easier for Nellie while she’s here,” says Sarah. “It makes me really proud that she has a giving little heart that wants to give back to the amazing Primary Children’s team.”​

Nellie’s service project isn’t finished yet. She and her mom have planned monthly service projects for the coming year. In May, she made Mother’s Day cards for the caregivers at PCH, and plans to do the same for Father’s Day in June. In July, they plan to hold a blood drive in honor of the two blood transfusions she’s received at Primary Children’s Hospital.

The post What Does Giving Back Look Like? Just Ask 7-year-old Nellie Mainor appeared first on Primary Children's Hospital - Utah.

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